BEHAVIOUR

Plastic Pollution

 

 

 

 

 

GENERAL

Working with values

Environmental Psychology

LITTERING

Linking social drivers of marine debris with actual marine debris on beaches
The drivers (social) and pressures (physical) of marine debris have typically been examined separately. We redress this by using social and beach surveys at nine Tasmanian beaches, across three coastlines and within three categories of urbanisation, to examine whether people acknowledge that their actions contribute to the issue of marine debris, and whether these social drivers are reflected in the amount of marine debris detected on beaches. A large proportion (75%) of survey participants do not litter at beaches; with age, gender, income and residency influencing littering behaviour. Thus, participants recognise that littering at beaches is a problem. This social trend was reflected in the small amounts of debris that were detected. Furthermore, the amount of debris was not statistically influenced by the degree of beach urbanisation, the coastline sampled, or the proximity to beach access points. By linking social and physical aspects of this issue, management outcomes can be improved.

Understanding littering behaviour

Clean up Australia Day -Rubbish report30% of all litter is plastic

MARINE POLLUTION

Marine plastic pollution: using community science to address a global problem – See more at: http://www.publish.csiro.au.libraryproxy.griffith.edu.au/?paper=MF14087#sthash.yJMLeBRG.dpuf

Debris from Australia

 

Advertisements