ART THEORY

http://site.ebrary.com.libraryproxy.griffith.edu.au/lib/griffith/reader.action?docID=10522059&ppg=13

https://practicalaesthetics.wordpress.com/2011/09/27/on-the-social-life-of-things/In The Social Life of Things (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), Arjun Appadurai argues for a “methodological fetishism” of commodities in analyzing the societies in which they circulate:

…we have to follow the things themselves, for their meanings are inscribed in their forms, their uses, their trajectories. It is only through the analysis of these trajectories that we can interpret the human transactions and calculations that enliven things. Thus, even though from a theoretical point of view human actors encode things with significance, from a methodological point of view it is the things-in-motion that illuminate their human and social context. (5)

 

http://media.proquest.com.libraryproxy.griffith.edu.au/media/pq/classic/doc/3577711531/fmt/ai/rep/NPDF?cit%3Aauth=De+Wolff%2C+Kim&cit%3Atitle=Gyre+Plastic%3A+Science%2C+Circulation+and+the+Matter+of+the+Great+Pacific+Garbage+Patch&cit%3Apub=ProQuest+Dissertations+and+Theses&cit%3Avol=&cit%3Aiss=&cit%3Apg=&cit%3Adate=2014&ic=true&cit%3Aprod=ProQuest+Dissertations+%26+Theses+Global&_a=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&_s=TK7wjGRCgR6IvYwsyKI%2BlcFcX0Q%3D

PhD

 

http://site.ebrary.com.libraryproxy.griffith.edu.au/lib/griffith/detail.action?docID=10233636

Bruno Latour – Actor Network Theory – ebook

 

How the Art of Social Practice Is Changing the World, One Row House at a Time

 

http://www.jstor.org.libraryproxy.griffith.edu.au/stable/778809?pq-origsite=summon&seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents kwon site

http://site.ebrary.com.libraryproxy.griffith.edu.au/lib/griffith/reader.action?docID=10579279&ppg=12

https://conservancy.umn.edu/bitstream/handle/11299/149945/Gravening,Tanya_MLS_Thesis.pdf?sequence=1

http://hy8fy9jj4b.search.serialssolutions.com/?ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&ctx_enc=info%3Aofi%2Fenc%3AUTF-8&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2Fsummon.serialssolutions.com&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Ajournal&rft.genre=article&rft.atitle=Marine+pollution.+Plastic+waste+inputs+from+land+into+the+ocean&rft.jtitle=Science+%28New+York%2C+N.Y.%29&rft.au=Jambeck%2C+Jenna+R&rft.au=Geyer%2C+Roland&rft.au=Wilcox%2C+Chris&rft.au=Siegler%2C+Theodore+R&rft.date=2015-02-13&rft.eissn=1095-9203&rft.volume=347&rft.issue=6223&rft.spage=768&rft_id=info%3Apmid%2F25678662&rft.externalDocID=25678662&paramdict=en-AU  Volumes of waste into the ocean 5-12 Million tonnes

http://www.algalita.org/credible-information-and-statistics/

 

Liboiron

The Anthropocene is a socio-material theory of planetary change. The term proposes that the conditions for life on Earth are entering thresholds of radical, irreversible, and uncer- tain change, impacting the viability of all species, including humans, because of industrial externalities from excess carbon dioxide to persistent organic pollutants (Crutzen and Stoermer, 2000; Steffen et al., 2011; Stromberg, 2013). The industrial materials that impact the environment within the Anthropocene, including but not limited to plastics and endocrine disruptors, have novel material make-ups, are produced at unprecedented scales, exhibit extreme longevity, and thus circulate into new realms with chances for potentially unknown modes of relation. In the Anthropocene, the ‘afterlives’ of industri- ally produced objects are the longest part of their lives. This goes beyond the problem of developing intergenerational methodologies for studying transgenerational effects of endocrine disruptors, for example, since even a multi-generational research program does not begin to approach the timescales characteristic of the Anthropocene. Instead, the Anthropocene paradoxically pushes us to think of relations between non-humans, rather than placing humans at the center of all relations, by placing humans on a shorter time scale than industrial objects.

The Anthropocene both centralizes and decentralizes humans. Humans, or, as Donna Haraway and many others have pointed out, certain humans’ economic and industrial practices (Haraway, 2015; Moore, 2014), are the driving force behind permanent changes in the Earth’s chemical and geological systems, yet these changes will outlast the human

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104 Journal of Material Culture 21(1) species, decentralizing our role in the longue durée of planetary systems. Discard studies

scholar Joshua Reno (2015: 566) warns:

care should be taken lest an appreciation for human impact become conflated with an anthropocentric belief in the power and reach of human managerial control. Waste, in all its variety and complexity, should serve as a reminder that we can never fully grasp the planetary processes to which we contribute, nor can we assume that they are easily managed.

With plastics, the presumption of waste ‘management’ stops making sense, and the idea that human agency and intentions play a determining role in material relations becomes untenable. A conversation about pollution, for example, becomes moot after humans and our socio-material norms are gone.

Yet the longue durée signaled by the Anthropocene is still imperative to think with now. A useful conceptual framework for Anthropoceneic material culture is scale. The Anthropocene relates our research sites and objects to the entire planet, forever. Scale is not about relative measurement, but about how quantitative shifts make a qualitative difference. Cultural geographers have long argued that scale is produced when narratives, metrics, or models posit that different kinds of things happen at different magnitudes or levels (Lefebvre, 1991; Smith, 1992; Soja, 1989). For example, arms do not act like skin and muscle cells, even though they are made entirely of cells, and chopping an arm into little pieces does not result in cells. The researcher interested in how cellular processes affect arms or in how arm motion impacts cells cannot simply zoom in and out with the microscope to understand the relationship between the two scales. By extension, if you want to treat harm in an arm (slings, bandages, ointment), you use fundamentally different processes than what you would use to treat a cell (washes, temperature changes, nutrients). The point is that scale is a way of talking about how things like physical properties and action hold together even as they remain ontologically distinct; arms and cells are never the same thing, but they are always in relation. So, too, are microplastics and plastic pollution.

Articulating the relations between things that are related but different, and even incommensurate, is one of the key activities of research. We ask: How is one instance of the object different from the wider phenomenon of objects in the world? How do the material and cultural aspects of objects shift at different spatial and temporal scales? How are these scales produced or complicated by the specific material characteristics of objects? It is not ‘wrong’ that some scientists think plastics are automatically out of place and thus count as pollution the moment they are in the ocean, while others want demon- strated empirical evidence of harm to life in a laboratory setting before they will agree to the designation of ‘pollution’. These arguments over matter and social relations, includ- ing my argument with the chemist over the ‘proper’ location and designation of toxicity, are at the core of maneuvering the radical changes that characterize everyday agency in a permanently polluted world, where purity, humancentricism, and management are una- ble to fully describe the complexity of socio-material relations.

 

Theses

 

Art as a catalyst for change
Three key ways in which artists facilitate environmental engagement are via creative thinking,

 eliciting emotional responses, 

and through participatory, reflective practices.

Catalysts for Change:Creative Practice as an Environmental Engagement Tool

This paper presents research investigating how creative practice can complement scientific discourses in engaging the public with environmental issues. Focusing on the Floating Land environmental art festival and The People’s Garden eco-visualization, this enquiry examines how participatory creative projects can engender social learning and reflection on environmental values that operate as catalysts for change. 

Three key ways in which artists facilitate environmental engagement are via creative thinking, eliciting emotional responses, and through participatory, reflective practices.

Engagement is defined here as incorporating one’s “personal connection with” the environment “comprising cognitive, emotional and behavioural aspects.” It “encompasses what people know, feel and do in relation to” environmental concerns [4 ].

Phenomenology and Artistic Praxis: An Application to Marine Ecological Communication

J ane Quon argues the need to approach ecological art with a phenomenological approach, presenting the idea that it is through experience and sensory perception, not our resigning of ideas, that we understand our connections and interrelationship with the ecological world.  Jane Quon is a Tasmanian artist who presented multimedia works not to the public but to policy makers – and describes her work arguing the case for phenomenology when presenting work of an ecological nature.

Beyond sensation The author, drawing on her experience as a New Zealand artist who has collaborated with meteorologists, suggests that artists may enter climate change discourse by translating (or mis-translating) scientific method into sensory affect. She examines three recent artprojects from Australasia that draw on natural phenomena: her own Anemocinegraph(2006-2007), Nola Farman’s working prototype The ice Tower(1998) and Out-of-Sync’s ongo ing on-line project, Talking about the Weather. The author citesHerbert Marcuse’s 1972 essay “Nature and Revolution,” which argues that sensation is the process that binds us materially and socially to the world.

 

Art and  understanding for Arts and Entertainment

One function of an artwork is to represent an idea, a communication from the artist to the audience, or a trigger to point the audience’s attention to a critical issue. Con- temporary art theory attaches great value to such critical content of an artwork, apart from its beauty or aesthetic value [Foster et al. 2004]. The physical experience of the artwork plays a role in the memorability, intelligibility, and strength of such a message. Artists can spend years perfecting an artwork, turning a critical idea into a meaningful communication that will touch the audience. Can automated methods help to speed up that process or to improve the quality and strength of experience for the audience?

 

 

Floating Island festival – Noosa

Provides a review of an ecological art festival held at Noosa in 2012, with regards to changing behaviour.  Found personal interactions through workshops provided most benefit in connecting people to place (required) and initiating change in behaviours.

This research builds on a previous study undertaken at Floating Land, and reported in this journal (Baldwin and Chandler 2010). That research used Photovoice techniques to garner the artists’, visitors’ and the local community’s responses to environmental art which addressed climate change and sea-level rise. One of the study’s findings posits that people will more likely identify specific pro-environmental actions (in that study, in relation to climate change) if they are associated with a specific place. It also suggests that sharing personal constructs about climate change among participants could elicit a strong motivation to act. This was reinforced by a perception that collaborative actions could achieve meaningful progress. The study revealed that the Floating Land event con- tributed to building adaptive capacity and reinforced the essential role of local people in engendering positive change, thus manifesting not only the aims of the Biosphere Reserve, but also Agenda 21.

 

Art Education: Contingent Communities, Social Dialogue, and Public Collaboration

By emphasizing the event of art production rather than its conclusion, interventionist art practice and teaching shifts focus away from the object toward the knowledge acquired in the act of production and reception. Furthermore, by situating this act in the public realm, artmaking opens itself to incidental and unanticipated connections to other areas of interest beyond presumed boundaries containing both art and art education. 

2. By expanding the parameters of artistic production and art educational practice to include public intervention, art’s relevance to other disciplines and concerns beyond the art classroom is made apparent, thus, validating artistic production as a unique and distinct form of inquiry and research.

3. When the academic environment within which students are asked to participate and learn largely dictates both the content and form of that participation, learning becomes something that happens as a consequenceof their presence in this environment rather than their investment in the ideas explored. By dissolving artificial divisions between the students’lives and their classroom experiences,interventionist art practice provides the opportunity for the students not only toinvestigate their local environment, but also to become both active agents in its composition and producers of the forms of knowledge more in sync with their own experiences.

4. Interventionist art education promotescollaborative knowledge construction as
a central pedagogical concern. Students become more aware of the negotiated, and sometimes arbitrary, nature of the regulations governing public social space and the types of knowledge that are developed within these monitored areas (Bourriaud, 2002). With this understanding, students may become morewilling, and indeed, more knowledgeable participants in the determination of the forms that their local environments assume and th types of activities that might take place there.

The Rubbish Report

 

Eco Art – A call for visionary intervention in a time of crisis

 

Re-imagining the environment: using an environmental art festival to encourage pro-environmental behaviour and a sense of place

Provides a review of an ecological art festival held at Noosa in 2012, with regards to changing behaviour.  Found personal interactions through workshops provided most benefit in connecting people to place (required) and initiating change in behaviours.

This research builds on a previous study undertaken at Floating Land, and reported in this journal (Baldwin and Chandler 2010). That research used Photovoice techniques to garner the artists’, visitors’ and the local community’s responses to environmental art which addressed climate change and sea-level rise. One of the study’s findings posits that people will more likely identify specific pro-environmental actions (in that study, in relation to climate change) if they are associated with a specific place. It also suggests that sharing personal constructs about climate change among participants could elicit a strong motivation to act. This was reinforced by a perception that collaborative actions could achieve meaningful progress. The study revealed that the Floating Land event con- tributed to building adaptive capacity and reinforced the essential role of local people in engendering positive change, thus manifesting not only the aims of the Biosphere Reserve, but also Agenda 21.

 

 

Art Education: Contingent Communities, Social Dialogue, and Public Collaboration

By emphasizing the event of art production rather than its conclusion, interventionist art practice and teaching shifts focus away from the object toward the knowledge acquired in the act of production and reception. Furthermore, by situating this act in the public realm, artmaking opens itself to incidental and unanticipated connections to other areas of interest beyond presumed boundaries containing both art and art education. 

2. By expanding the parameters of artistic production and art educational practice to include public intervention, art’s relevance to other disciplines and concerns beyond the art classroom is made apparent, thus, validating artistic production as a unique and distinct form of inquiry and research.

3. When the academic environment within which students are asked to participate and learn largely dictates both the content and form of that participation, learning becomes something that happens as a consequenceof their presence in this environment rather than their investment in the ideas explored. By dissolving artificial divisions between the students’lives and their classroom experiences,interventionist art practice provides the opportunity for the students not only toinvestigate their local environment, but also to become both active agents in its composition and producers of the forms of knowledge more in sync with their own experiences.

4. Interventionist art education promotescollaborative knowledge construction as
a central pedagogical concern. Students become more aware of the negotiated, and sometimes arbitrary, nature of the regulations governing public social space and the types of knowledge that are developed within these monitored areas (Bourriaud, 2002). With this understanding, students may become morewilling, and indeed, more knowledgeable participants in the determination of the forms that their local environments assume and th types of activities that might take place there.

 

Environmental sociology

 

 

The lorax
Original video from 1977 – Dr Seus  Provides a narrative about mankind and natural resources;   tells the story of industry, economic drive, consumerism and the impact on nature.  Can be applied – and covers off most damaging activities in a fun, funny, and poignant way.

” I’ll speak for the trees.  I’ll yell and I’ll shout for the the things on earth that are on their way out..”

 

 

Suzi Gablic Ecological imperatives

Phenomenology and Artistic Praxis: An Application to Marine Ecological Communication

Beyond sensation

 

Art and Social change in Asia pacific – book

sustaining sustainability

Floating Island festival – Noosa

Re-imagining the environment: using an environmental art festival to encourage pro-environmental behaviour and a sense of place

Digital eco-art

systems thinking in eco-art

Art in the Anthropocene

A SHORT HISTORY OF PLASTIC- HEATHER DAVIS

Argues plastic is responsible for consumerism; the promise of control over nature; shifts the time perspective to consider the usefulness/lifespan of plastic against its damage; raises issues of time/compostability/cycles of life and death vs undead.   Argues plastic   will contribute to the death of humanity;   proposes two outcomes – Finitude – the end of carbon based life – and exinguishment – a scenario where life continues as life evolves and mutates.

Cultural commentator – PHD in Aesthetic studies….plastic.

 

 

Aethetics in marine science

Eco-art events

Ghost net events

Eco-art in singapore

Phenomenology and Artistic Praxis: An Application to Marine Ecological Communication

J ane Quon argues the need to approach ecological art with a phenomenological approach, presenting the idea that it is through experience and sensory perception, not our resigning of ideas, that we understand our connections and interrelationship with the ecological world.  Jane Quon is a Tasmanian artist who presented multimedia works not to the public but to policy makers – and describes her work arguing the case for phenomenology when presenting work of an ecological nature.

 

Beyond sensation The author, drawing on her experience as a New Zealand artist who has collaborated with meteorologists, suggests that artists may enter climate change discourse by translating (or mis-translating) scientific method into sensory affect. She examines three recent artprojects from Australasia that draw on natural phenomena: her own Anemocinegraph(2006-2007), Nola Farman’s working prototype The ice Tower(1998) and Out-of-Sync’s ongo ing on-line project, Talking about the Weather. The author citesHerbert Marcuse’s 1972 essay “Nature and Revolution,” which argues that sensation is the process that binds us materially and socially to the world.

 

principles of social change – book

Theory-based evaluation and the social impact of the arts  Social problems not environmental – but does call for a different type of analysis of successs – stating that social change can take time and cannot be measured simply…

Eco Art – AA call for visionary intervention in a time of crisis

 

 

 

 

 

 

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